Sunday, September 21, 2008

BMI linked to recurrent miscarriages

Photo by www.presstv.ir
UK scientists have found that in the absence of any underlying disease, obese women are more vulnerable to recurrent miscarriagesUK scientists have found that in the absence of any underlying disease, obese women are more vulnerable to recurrent miscarriages.

According to a study presented at the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynecology's international meeting, obese women with a positive history of miscarriage are at a greater risk of subsequent pregnancy loss.

Findings show the risk of a second miscarriage is increased by 73 percent in such individuals.

Previous studies had reported that the mother's higher BMI is associated with a lower fertility rate along with an increased risk of pregnancy-related complications and fetal malformations.

The study revealed that the mother's age is another factor contributing to miscarriage.

Researchers at the London's St Mary's Hospital concluded that women with recurrent miscarriages should be weighed at their first consultation, adding that losing weight is dangerous in pregnant women.

Source: http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=70156§ionid=3510210



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